Reasons Why Weight Training is good for People with Back Pain

People with back pain may not think lifting weights is a good idea, but it turns out that weight training can fix some of the symptoms and get rid of the pain to some degree. A study conducted at the University of Alberta shows that training the whole body and conditioning it can bring up the quality of life for people suffering from back pain, by about 28 percent. In addition to that, weight training is also associated with physical and mental well-being.

Generally, back pain occurs as a result of weak or underused muscles, a weak core caused by issues with postural alignment, or weak abdominal muscles. This can deteriorate spinal alignment, and a weak core can get in the way of good balance and support. Strength training can help resolve these problems and loosen the joints, while strengthening the muscles of the back, chest, and legs can keep the back pain in check.

You can benefit the most by ensuring that your strength-training program acts on the core muscles, which include the internal and external oblique, as well as transverse abdominal muscles. The other major muscles in the body are the legs, back, and chest, and with a variety of exercises, it is possible to target the right muscles and keep the pain away.

Weight machines, free weights, and body weight exercises can be used as well to help ease the pain. Weight machines are good for easing the strain on the back, while free weights and body weight exercises improve posture and stability by making use of the whole body.

A personal trainer can help you better understand which movements are right and which should be avoided, because some exercises, such as dead lifts, snatches, and squats are not good for back pain. If you are lifting weights, it is important to take the right safety measures.

Stretching and warming up before lifting weights is another important step one should take. You can have a trainer help you with as well as helping you with maintaining a proper form and posture. As always, it is safer and more sensible to start with lighter weights and fewer repetitions, and moving on to higher numbers and weights as you build up your strength.

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